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  • Kujunou
    Posts: 2
    Joined: Sep 2nd, 2007
    Phase effect vs Phasing effect
    Martin , in your tutorial on Delay and phase( 101 tutorial 31) you talk about getting a phase effect by doubling a sound and delaying one of them slightly, which in essence gives you a resultant sound that sums the two source sounds with a static delay time. I think this differs from the actual use of a phaser effect unit/plugin,which varies the delay time of the doubled sound over a short period of time to get the resultant sound. Just trying to get things in phase in my head---- am I right /wrong, does it even matter? Thx
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  • Martin
    Posts: 476
    Joined: Aug 24th, 2004
    Re: Phase effect vs Phasing effect
    Hey Proceed, This is still a phase effect, just a static one. But yes, to get the classisc "phasing effect," the delay time does need to vary so you hear the movement of the phase over time. And actually, I guess to be exact, I should point out that the 2-copies technique from the tutorial is really Flanging, because 2 exact copies of the same sound are played simultaneously with no additionaly filtLiterally, the waveforms are pulled "out of phase." The effect was created by early audio engineers experimenting with running 2 copies of their reel to reel tapes simultaneously. When running at a static speed, they experienced much the same effect as demonstrated in the tutorials. But, when one of them pushed on the "flange" of the tape (the rim around the outside) the playback of one reel to reel fluctuated in speed due to the extra pressure. This caused 1 reel to play slightly slower, and then faster again. Voila, the flange effect. From that grew phasing, chorusing, and a bunch of cool sound-stuff ...
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  • Kujunou
    Posts: 2
    Joined: Sep 2nd, 2007
    Re: Phase effect vs Phasing effect
    Thanks for the helpful response. Just trying to get my head around sound design proper--doing the MacProVideo's has definitely been a great inspiration --so props to the whole crew. Delving into the nerdier side of things, it seems like almost all of the effects used to enhance or enrich the perception of sound involve a "delay" of the source signal in one way or another(Phasing,flanging,chorus, reverb,delay )," copies" of the source signal . .Is tremolo the only one that is an exception? (? only amplitude modulation). Whoa, just had a moment when thinking about panning---in 'real life ' our peception of a sounds placement in space involves binaural processing-the most important factor being the difference in time that the sound takes to reach both ears(a delay effect) but in stereo sound placement (panning a sound) its trickery-using a difference in the amplitude/volume of the sound between the speakers . I guess their truly is a Space AND Time Continium.......plus amplitude(damn quarks}.
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